what is lift on a plane

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what is lift on a plane

What is Lift? - NASA

May 05, 2015· Lift is the force that directly opposes the weight of an airplane and holds the airplane in the air. Lift is generated by every part of the airplane, but most of the lift on a normal airliner is generated by the wings. Lift is a mechanical aerodynamic force produced by the motion of the airplane through the air. Because lift is a force, it is a vector quantity, having both a magnitude and a ...

NASA - What Is Aerodynamics?

What Is Lift? Lift is the push that lets something move up. It is the force that is the opposite of weight. Everything that flies must have lift. For an aircraft to move upward, it must have more lift than weight. A hot air balloon has lift because the hot air inside is lighter than the air around it. Hot air rises and carries the balloon with it.

NASA - The Four Forces of Flight

Lift is the force that holds an airplane in the air. The wings create most of the lift used by airplanes. The way the four forces act on the airplane make the plane do different things. Each force has an opposite force that works against it. Lift works opposite of weight. Thrust works opposite of drag.

physics: Lift on airplane? | Yahoo Answers

Apr 19, 2011· Air streams horizontally past a small airplane's wings such that the speed is 68.0m/s over the top surface and 58.0m/s past the bottom surface. Part A: If the plane has a mass of 1380kg and a wing area of 16.2 m^2 what is the magnitude of the net vertical force (including the effects of gravity) on the airplane? The density of the air is 1.20kg/m^3 Fnet=.....N What is the direction of the net ...

How Do Airplanes Fly? | Live Science

Aug 28, 2006· Lift is reduced, and the plane enters a stall and falls from the sky. Trained pilots can recover a plane from a stall by pointing the nose downward and increasing the plane's speed until lift …

Four Forces of Flight - Science World

Lift opposes gravity and thrust opposes drag . Drag and gravity are forces that act on anything lifted from the earth and moved through the air. Thrust and lift are artificially created forces used to overcome the forces of nature and enable an airplane to fly. Airplane engine and propeller combination is designed to produce thrust to overcome ...

How Do Airplanes Fly: Weight and Lift - How Airplanes Work ...

A Boeing 747-8 passenger airliner, for instance, has a maximum takeoff weight of 487.5 tons (442 metric tons), the force with which the weighty plane is drawn toward the Earth. Weight's opposing force is lift, which holds an airplane in the air.

Lift - Aviation For Kids

Aerodynamic lift is a very complex phenomenon but by the end of this section you will have a pretty good image about it. A.Newton Sir Isaac Newton() Theory: Airplanes fly because wings deflect air downward so that in reaction the plane is forced upward.

What action lifts an airplane's nose during take off ...

Question:-"What action lifts an airplane's nose during take off?" The pilot pulling back on the 'Yoke' or 'Stick' will defect the elevators at the rear of the aircraft to a up angle causing it to push the tail down. This raises the nose and increa...

What is lift on a airplane? - Answers

Lift is what " Lifts" an airplane off of the ground. Most commonly an airfoil wing is used to achieve lift. An airfoil is when the top of the wing is curved and the bottom is flat. This makes the ...

Airplanes & Force: Thrust, Drag, Lift & Weight | Study

An airplane has four main forces that act on it. These forces are called thrust, drag, lift, and weight. Thrust is the forward force that pushes the plane along the runway and forwards through the ...

The Four Forces | How Things Fly

An airplane in flight is always in the middle of a tug-of-war with the four forces. For an airplane to takeoff, thrust must be greater than drag and lift must be greater than weight. To maintain level flight, lift must equal weight and thrust must equal drag. For landing, thrust must be less than drag, and lift …

How Airplanes Fly: A Physical Description of Lift

The plane adjusts the angle of attack of the inverted wing to give the desired lift. The popular explanation implies that inverted flight is impossible. As one can see, the popular explanation, which fixates on the shape of the wing, may satisfy many but it does not give one the tools to really understand flight.

The 4 Forces Of An Aircraft. Thrust, Drag, Lift, and ...

Sep 16, 2019· An airplane which is situated on the ground, doesn't have any Lift but it has Weight. Lift is proportional to the square of the velocity of an airplane. This means that if the velocity of the ...

Factors Affecting Lift | How Things Fly

Flaps change a wing's curvature, increasing lift. Airplanes use flaps to maintain lift at lower speeds, particularly during takeoff and landing. This allows an airplane to make a slower landing approach and a shorter landing. Flaps also increase drag, which helps slow the airplane and allows a …

What is Angle of attack? - Aircraft Nerds

The lift in the airplane or aircraft is produced by it's wings. The angle of attack in simple words we can say that is the inclination of the wing to the flight direction of the plane. This has a large effect on the lift generated by the wing.

How Airplanes Fly - RC Airplane World

Essentially there are 4 aerodynamic forces that act on an airplane in flight; these are lift, drag, thrust and weight (i.e. gravity). In simple terms, drag is the resistance of air molecules hitting the airplane (the backward force), thrust is the power of the airplane's engine (the forward force), lift is the upward force and weight is the ...

NOVA - Official Website | Lift and Drag

Moderate Lift, Low Drag (Aerobatic Plane) This airfoil is symmetrical, meaning the curve of the upper surface is the same as that of the lower surface. This results in little drag. But unlike the ...

Lift (force) - Wikipedia

Lift is the force that holds an aircraft in the air. Lift can be generated by any part of the airplane, but most of the lift on a normal airliner is generated by the wings. Lift is an aerodynamic force produced by the motion of a fluid past an object. Lift acts through the center of pressure of the object and is defined to be perpendicular to the flow direction.

Airplane Wings - How Lift is Created - Decoded Science

Nov 12, 2019· Airplane wings, designed as airfoils, achieve this by interacting with the remote airflow to produce the desired lift. Understanding Air at the Molecular Level. Air is composed of molecules moving randomly at high speeds. With respect to airplane wings, these molecules exert a force on the airfoil, whenever they come in contact with it.

Lift | physics | Britannica

Lift, upward-acting force on an aircraft wing or airfoil.An aircraft in flight experiences an upward lift force, as well as the thrust of the engine, the force of its own weight, and a drag force. The lift force arises because the speed at which the displaced air moves over the top of the airfoil (and over the top of the attached boundary layer) is greater than the speed at which it moves over ...

Airplane Aerodynamics - Understanding How Planes Fly - CAU

Aug 31, 2018· Weight, lift, thrust and friction are constantly pushing and pulling on one another, with the airplane in the middle. Applying aerodynamic principles to all aspects of flight is essential to advancing the scope of aviation.

Lift Force - Wright 1903 Flyer

Jun 12, 2014· Lift is the force that holds an aircraft in the air. Lift can be generated by any part of the airplane, but most of the lift on an airplane is generated by the wings. HOW IS LIFT GENERATED? There are many explanations for the generation of lift found in encyclopedias, in basic physics textbooks, and on Web sites.

Center of Gravity, and Center of Lift – PowerUp Toys

May 17, 2020· Center of Lift (CL) All the partial lift powers that are generated from the wings can be replaced with one collective force, generated from the Center of Lift (CL). Stability, CG and CL. The relations between the CL and the CG locations determine the stability of the airplane. See this example of a stable aircraft: The CG is in front of the CL.